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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My SSD isn't very fast for some reason"

  • 9 hours ago
  • 1 point

my SSD on my computer is only downloading games at 5mbs per second

You mean your computer is downloading games from the internet, at 5mbps, over your 5-20mbps internet connection?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 1 day ago
  • 2 points

I have a 2600 in my work computer and a 1700X in my personal home computer.

Honestly, can't tell the difference in day to day use, even with photo editing, virtualization, a hundred tabs, etc.

Can't really compare on gaming since I don't game at work and very rarely game at home.

https://www.techpowerup.com/review/amd-ryzen-5-2600/12.html

...according to those tests, even at 720P the diff is only like 2.4% (2600 slightly better)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "** What CPU for has the best value - performance - future proof ? **"

  • 3 days ago
  • 2 points

Looking back on whose upgrading, and when.... Folks who bought $330 i7's with hyperthreading in the sandy/ivy/haswell era have often had the option to keep those machines in service for ~5-8 years, because performance has remained acceptable. The extra ~$130 over the price of the i5 they could have gone with, does appear to have added ~1-4 years of useful life to systems on average.

Started seeing WAVES of people on PCP wanting to upgrade out of their i5-3570/4460/6500/7500 type systems over the last few years, meanwhile, lots of people still running their i7-2600K/3770K/4770K/6700K/7700K systems.

The point is, a higher end CPU (as well as having enough RAM or willingness to upgrade it) does seem to extend the useful life of a machine. If a $2000 machine lasts you 6 years, while the $1500 machine lasts 4 years, then the extra $500 will not have been a waste.

On the other hand, buying into the midstream of the market every 3-4 years has it's benefits as well. There's no right/wrong answer here, though it would make sense to "tune" the entirety of a build for the intended life of the machine. For a 3-4 year build, maybe 16-32GB RAM is appropriate. Maybe for a 5-7 year build, we should consider 32-64GB RAM. With RAM being so cheap right now (DDR4 finally reaching commodity level maturity), I'd be tempted to outfit a 3900X build with 64GB RAM to really lock in the long haul.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 1600 Owner, Time to Upgrade"

  • 19 days ago
  • 2 points

So many situations where the 1600 is still worth buying for a new build, let alone replacing or upgrading it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

Nah... I'm just having another busy week at work. Haven't had much free time to participate on the forums. I agree that the list was getting out of hand for an apartment network solution.

Weekend! I'll put together a list....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PCIe or M.2 WiFi"

  • 27 days ago
  • 2 points

Go PCIe. Those m.2 chips are really for laptops...

Lots of PCIE WiFi cards just have the little "mini" card found in laptops mounted to a PCIE PCB adapter board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 29 days ago
  • 1 point

I have had such bad luck with refurb stuff in the past,that is why im so hesitant on getting anything refurb/renewed.

Was it commercial/enterprise grade stuff or something else?

I'd expect to have more problems with one of these NAS boxes than with a refurb server.

The main reason for the cloud is for the remote access.

I'm under the impression, that the reason to use these cloud keys is to offer a cloud management solution for multiple different sites. Think... software defined networking of many locations from a single management pane.

If you only have 1 site, then a cloud connected controller is an unnecessary capability/cost. You can run the unify applications on a VM on your server, then access your network, including the unify applications, over a VPN.

Also... I see a cable modem in the list... Are you replacing your cable modem for the fun of it as well? Something wrong with yours?

Any suggestions on the pfsense firewall you spoke of?

It's a different direction... If you're thinking an "all ubiquity" config, then pfsense would throw a monkey wrench in there that isn't managed under the same "unified" set of applications.

You need to decide if you're all-in on ubiquity or ...?

pfsense router, netgear switches, turn your existing router/AP into an AP only? Lots of ways to do this.

Also the NAS that I linked what would be a good one? I really like that Qnap one for $2000 something but it is kinda expensive but it pretty much has everything I could want plus its a i7 and a lot faster than most of the ones I have been looking at.

I'll repeat, I think the better value is in a refurbish rack mount server. I don't have experience with these consumer grade NAS's so can't make a specific recommendation; but expect they will be very limited compared to a proper server in terms of CPU power, RAM, I/O, drives, compatibility, etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 29 days ago
  • 1 point

Sorry It's been so long..

Thoughts on this latest "all-ubiquity" list:

  1. The switches don't have 10G ports. Perhaps a US-16-XG-US on the rack and a US-XG-6POE in bedroom/s would make more sense.

  2. If you're going to buy a "rack" anyway, may as well use a refurb server for your NAS.

  3. If you're going to run a "Server" of sorts, that could spin up VM's or containers, then you can run your own ubiquity controller application on your internal network. No need for a "cloud key" unless you want your controller hosted in the cloud and externally accessible.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How long will i5-6500 survive?"

  • 29 days ago
  • 1 point

In addition, if he does for some reason need more threads in a few years, I'm sure the price of used i7's will only continue to plummet in price as this AMD/Intel CPU war continues.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

When Intel launches new gen products that cut-off availability of old-gen products. The demand for i7's to upgrade old platforms is actually very high as a result of workloads demanding more threads, causing old i7's to sell for way more than they are worth relative to new CPU alternatives.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2nd Build $3000 budget"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

ECC on this "enthusiast" platform will likely always be sort of in a state of "partially" supported... As in... it might work but no assurances.

Not sure if I would "count" on it happening... but I would still be looking seriously at this platform either way. This is the most advanced architecture and platform you'll be able to buy for awhile. Just buy high quality memory rated at or above the memory controllers rated speed, and configure it to run at the supported speeds.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2nd Build $3000 budget"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I think you'd be well served to hold out for threadripper 3000 AND availability of Xeon W-2200 series before making the final decision. Probably a month for threadripper, probably more for the Xeons...

On the Intel side, the W-2200 series is "launched" but still vaporware. The W-2265, W-2275, and W-2295 are probably the chips to keep an eye on. 12, 14, and 18 core options priced reasonably (~$950 ~$1100, ~$1350 respectively)

The W-2100 series are hard to find in stock anywhere and very overpriced for what you get. Not a good buy-in time for what is basically last-gen pricing model for enthusiast/enterprise gear.

Based on what we have seen Rome doing in serverspace, and how well this new architecture works at scale, threadripper 3 is going to be another nice leap in computing for the enthusiast platform. Expect to see the 16 core TR beating 18 core Xeon's in most workloads. I expect they will price this new 16 core chip around $1000.

Food for thought: AMD's 24 Core Epyc Rome 7402P is trading blows with similarly clocked 28 core Xeons while dissipating less power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2nd Build $3000 budget"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Hi Curtisg35,

I'll try to swing by with a build recommendation later this week.

HINT:

Xeon W-2100/2200 series

C422 chipset motherboard, maybe SM X11SRA, or ASUS WS C422 PRO/SE, Maybe ASRock Rack X299 WS or C422 WS.

Healthy dose of ECC DDR4


Alternatively.... wait for threadripper 3000 series and a motherboard with ECC support claimed working. (I think this would be worth the wait).


Also: DDR4 has a number of stability enhancements compared to DDR3. Might be worth considering skipping ECC support this round. Not as big a deal these days.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RMx 750w vs RMx 850w - does future proofing make sense"

  • 1 month ago
  • 3 points

Hi Blubby,

The RMx 750 and 850 both have 2 X 8-pin EPS power connectors. These are for CPU power ONLY.

The RMx 750 has 4 X 6+2pin PCIE power connectors.

The RMx 850 has 6 X 6+2pin PCIE power connectors.

The PCIE power connections are ONLY for PCIE(gpu) power.

EPS and PCIE6+2 power are not interchangeable. They are physically and electrically different.


Since the cost difference is around 10 bucks, would it make sense to go with the higher wattage supply even though the current build doesn't demand it, to 'future proof' yourself by that one extra 8pin slot?

It's actually 2 extra 6+2 pin PCIE connectors and 1 extra SATA connector, and 1 longer SATA power cable.

Unless you're planning on a LARGE installment of SATA devices or multi-GPU, then it won't make any difference.

will the idle power draw be higher?

It could be higher, could be lower. While the "rule of thumb" for efficiency curves would suggest that a higher power PSU would have higher idle power draw, the difference between a 750W and 850W, is going to be so small (like a fraction of a watt), that tolerances from one unit to the next could put an 850W unit idling more efficiently than a 750W unit in some comparisons. Furthermore, that "rule of thumb" is broken by many examples. There could be a slightly difference in component selection/topology in the 850W that actually makes it superior for idle power.

In otherwords, you should not concern yourself with the differences in idle power dissipation. It doesn't matter.

or is it bogus and getting a new PSU in the years is a requirement anyway due to the lifespan of the PSU?

I think a good quality PSU should last 10 years or around 2 "builds."

These modern PSU's are very well made and likely to last a long time, probably longer than 10 years, but there's likely to be a change in standards that prevents todays PSU from working with computers of the future.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How long will i5-6500 survive?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Power wise the i5 really doesn't seem very far behind the Ryzen

A 2600 has near double the available execution throughput.

As workloads scale out, there will be a difference in longevity.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How long will i5-6500 survive?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

If a stated goal is longevity, the extra $100 towards the build to do a 6C/12T CPU could easily double the useful life of the build before major overhaul is required.

I expect the 6500 will begin to show it's age across a wide range of games within 2-3 years. Lots of people with i5-4460/4570/6500/6600 are already replacing these machines with newer, high core count rigs to solve gaming performance issues.

Sure, it may look "way more expensive" but when you consider what it buys, (not having to do this again in 2 years, instead being in a good position for a 4-5+ year run), it's actually much better value.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Been busy with work and fixing a personal computer problem.... I haven't forgot about ya ;) just ran out of time... I'll try to share some more ideas on the above later this evening!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What happened to all the black/red GPUs with the newer generations?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

What happened to green PCB's and computers that look like computers? ;)

Seems the only way to get a half professional looking computer these days is to buy server parts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Sad Day - AM4 Socket question"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

X570 and B450 are chipsets.

AM4 is the socket.

AMD has "Stretched" cross compatibility for 3 generations of chipsets (300/400/500) and CPU's (Ryzen 1000/2000/3000) on a single socket (AM4). Most combinations work with the proper BIOS versions but there are functionality limitations and some CPU's aren't supported on all boards.

The B450M Pro4 should work fine with the 2700X. Though it is a high power CPU so be sure to provide some airflow over those VRM heatsinks on the motherboard for best results.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

No need to be sorry you didn't know,I should of told you in the first place.

No prob.

My Router is this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KWHMR6G?tag=pcpapi-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1 My internet is 50mbit down 5mbit up.

That's a pretty decent home router/wifi device. As a router/firewall, I don't see any reason to replace it for a 50/5 connection.

The only reason to replace something like that, would be if the wifi isn't reaching through the apartment, or if you wanted to get into something more sophisticated like running a pfsense firewall for application layer packet inspection, etc.

I don't mind about the AP I know its over kill. I did look it over and I do like all the stuff you can do with it. Just wish it would say how many feet it covers hopefully that covers 800 square feet but for what ya said it's mainly used for it does sound like it would.

Ubiquity doesn't really rate range on their commercial stuff, because they understand that there is no rating they could give that would be applicable to a broad range of customers. Everyone has different material and RF environments to contend with that can dramatically change the useful range of an access point. Everyone has different devices with different WiFI performance that will dramatically impact useful range as well.

Looking at the drawing of your apartment, it is more like the 16 X 50 shape I talked about. If you access point is on the far living room wall, I could see that having a hard time reaching across the entire apartment.

A "mesh" configuration of 2 hotspots would work better for that layout if you're trying to get wifi to the kitchen more reliably. Alternatively, if your WiFi was separate of your router, then you could install it in your bedroom instead, which would centrally locate it, which should eliminate the need for more AP's.

Plus I don't mind how difficult it might be I like tinkering with that kind of stuff and learning.

I wonder if you might enjoy setting up and using a pfsense firewall. You can run pfsense on lots of commodity hardware. There are inexpensive little fanless computers on amazon sold specifically as "firewall appliance" computers. They come with numerous ethernet ports, and usually low power atom type CPU's. If you're interested I can make suggestions....

The router you picked in the first round does that have a firewall built in if not I found some firewalls I could add to the Network even some come with cloud key really not sure what cloud key does.

A firewall is a router configured to block inbound connections. Yes, the ubiquity router/wifi units I was suggesting are also a "firewall."

Though, if you're concerned about whether the firewall is "good enough," consider setting up a pfsense firewall instead. It gives you access to "firewall" tools that are FAR more sophisticated than you'll get from a typical plug-n-play consumer firewall. Most people would consider it too complicated, and for home use, that's a reasonable opinion since it's rare for home networks to be targeted.

What I plan to do with the NAS is OS backups,File Backups,Game Backups,Pictures etc.

Really no reason to do OS backups unless you're talking about taking snapshots of server systems running in a virtual enviroment or something for the sake of maximizing business continuity for a commercial setup. Backup important files, software can be reinstalled easily enough.

I may want to host a file server,forum,website. maybe a game server if possible.

That means forwarding incoming requests to a computer inside the network. This is where some security engineering is worth some effort. Do you really want the outside world to be able to establish connections to machines inside your personal/home network?

With every convenience comes a security compromise.

Personally I would not host any of those sorts of services from a machine on the same network as my "home" network. Many people do, but I wouldn't.

This is where a more sophisticated router (like a pfsense box) might come in handy. You could create a "trusted" network, and an "burner" network. Use the trusted network as a place to run your personal computers and devices on. Put a totally separate computer on the burner network to host servers from, so that it is isolated from the rest of your stuff. On the "burner," host whatever servers you intend to run as VM's and do periodic snapshots so that you can roll back if they are compromised.

I would like to have my own Cloud too. I do have wireless Security cameras I could use to record stuff on to the NAS.

Here again, I would not put a NAS to work for both personal storage and a "cloud" hosting device. Access your personal stuff through a VPN. Host public stuff from a different spoke of the network.

I understand a lot of these "NAS" solutions claim to be "every server in a box" solutions, but if you deploy them as such, you're placing a LOT of trust in the security isolation within a single system. It would be wise to assume that it's your responsibility to separate functions into trusted and untrusted zones.

Remember, your 5Mbps upstream will be your downstream when you're elsewhere. Sometimes paying for a cloud service is better. Spinning up a VM on amazon/azure/google is not very expensive. Lots of cloud based storage solutions to consider.

Yea for $1000 I was hoping for more than 4 drive bays I am still deciding. Between Ausutor,QNAP and Synology they all have nice NAS its hard to find one that has like 10 bays and a lot of features and be fast. One of the NAS I looked at has the Ryzen 1700 CPU with 64gig ram in it but you probably could imagine how expensive it was lol....

Some are expensive,I have a bad habit looking at reviews and some have bad reviews and scares me away,don't want to spend all that money and have it fail after a year. I'm trying to find one that has a lot of bays,a lot of features and is fast,and doesn't require me to buy add ins like the 10G cards or a graphic card etc.

I am assuming the small bays are for SSD and those help with read and write speeds?

Some of them do implement the SSD's as "cache" drives, so that writes go faster and frequently accessed reads also go faster. It's a good idea, though personally, I would rather have a dedicated fast and slow pool of data used for different things.

I forgot to add something the reason I went with managed stuff for the switches etc. is so I can play with the software something to learn :) I like fiddling with stuff like that,that's other reason with the AP I picked,I really like all the graphical graphs etc. it has.

That's reasonable. Also, if you wanted to host a separate untrusted network, it might be useful to isolate it internally with VLAN control.

The graphical stuff that you can "See" using commercial ubiquity gear, is all hosted by the unify software that you'll have to spin up on a server system. That's not running on the AP itself. An important distinction.... You don't have to buy the $300 access point to get that. You can buy a $50 (used) unify access point and get the same software control.

On that subject... if you don't want a wall/ceiling mount unit, but really want the unify commercial solution, the UniFi FlexHD access point is worth a look. A PAIR would be nice for your long apartment if one is placed on each end. Otherwise, place a single in the bedroom.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3700X or 2700X for 1440p gaming?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 3 points

Listen to what vegabond is saying here.

I'll phrase this another way to help with your pondering:

The amount of CPU "power" required to achieve is particular FPS goal, does not change with resolution.

Increasing resolution does increase the amount of work for the GPU per frame rendered, but it does NOT decrease the amount of work the CPU has to do to deliver the wireframe data and draw calls to the GPU for that frame.

The "range" of acceptable FPS for "PC" gaming is very narrow compared to the range of acceptable visual quality. FPS is a requirement, visual quality isn't.

Go back 20 years. PC gaming was commonly played on CRT monitors at 75-150+ FPS (gamers often sought out high end CRT monitors that could be driven to very high refresh rates at lower resolution for first person shooters and such). GPU's have increased in power by approximately 10,000X since 1999. Todays "PC gaming" FPS is ~60-180+. The frame-rate hasn't really changed.

Think about that the next time you're looking at gaming benchmarks that use "FPS" as a yardstick to compare GPU's. They are just using "FPS" as a yardstick under fixed conditions to compared render throughput. In the real world, you're not limited to running any specific setting. You can adjust settings to balance performance vs visual quality within the hard limits set by the CPU and monitor refresh rate.

More CPU power means a more headroom to "adjust" into. If that's important to you, pay for it, if not, don't ;)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Hi James,

Sorry I made an assumption there that would over-complicate things for an apartment size application. 1-2 AP's will be fine. Doesn't need to be a commercial mesh type thing.

That $300 access point you have in this latest list is overkill... Designed for high density commercial applications like coffee shops, restaurants, entertainment venues, where people are expected to really "pack in." It's designed to service up to ~300 connected devices. No doubt, it would work really well for an apartment. If you're thinking about only having 1 access point, this would work but be more complicated to manage than necessary for a small space.


Router/Wifi:

An "old" wireless router doesn't necessarily need to be replaced unless it is a performance bottleneck or security risk. Do you have blazing fast internet that is being slowed down by the router? Does the manufacture of your wireless router still release security updates for it? (new firmware?)... Does it only support an old/slow wireless standard? Do you have a ton of wifi connected devices causing the wifi performance to choke? Does the wifi not reach the far end of the apartment? Any of these things could be a good reason to replace it.

800sq ft sounds like a 2 bedroom. If your apartment is arranged out in a "square," (~26 X 30), use a single good wifi access point/router combo. If your apartment is arranged in a long rectangle (~16 X 50), get a easy-setup 2-hot-spot wifi system.

My advise for an apartment that is "square" in shape, would be to pick up the Ubiquity Amplifi HD router/wifi box. That's $150. If you have a rectangle shaped apartment, pick up the Ubiquity Amplifi instant "2-pack" kit, that comes with a router and 1 additional base. That's $180. The little wifi "bases" are clean looking boxes you can put on an entertainment center or night stand or whatever. This system only needs power to the additional boxes, no Ethernet (it uses a separate wireless connection between bases).

Links:

https://www.amazon.com/AmpliFi-Ubiquiti-Seamless-Wireless-Extenders/dp/B07HHHC8JB/

https://www.amazon.com/AmpliFi-Router/dp/B07YNX7WJN/

Doesn't have to be unify, but they have made a big name for themselves in wireless for a reason. Expect reasonably long-term security update support and a reliable product that delivers strong wifi signal.


Switches:

Here's an interesting switch:

https://www.amazon.com/QNAP-QSW-308S-Switch-Gigabit-Unmanaged/dp/B07VC9RTR9/

Gives you 3 X 10G SFP+ ports at each switch. Buy 2-3 of these. Connect each bedroom switch to the living room switch with fiber (probably just use multi-mode or short-run single mode transcivers, since they are cheap). Might be able to connect the NAS to the living room switch with a direct-attach "twinax" SFP+ cable. Might also be able to connect your computer to the switch with a DAC cable as well.

Just connect the router to a 1G port.

FS can build custom DAC's to connect different brands. Might be worth reaching out to them to have the custom cables made, or just buy transceivers for both sides of the equation. Might also be worth asking them which transceiver "types" are likely to work with the QNAP switch. In this case, it would be much cheaper to go fiber because the transceivers are only ~$20-25 for MM or short range SM fiber, compared to ~$65 for an Ethernet transceiver.


10G SFP+ cards:

I think with the switches up for consideration above (SFP+)... it's worth returning to your original "refurb" NIC ideas there...

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017O9VPYY

Problem is.... you can buy 4 of these for less money than a single "genuine/new" card. After some reading around, some of these really cheap "refurb" 10G cards are in fact, legitimate pulls from datacenters. They are just older versions of the 10G cards. You can have spares on hand... For home use, screw it, I'd take the chance on these. About the least expensive genuine, new, 10G card you'll find that's a proper mellanox/intel/broadcom controller, is ~$150+ for a single port. Sketchier ones from 10GTek and FS.com (which have an Intel chip but may not be very genuine otherwise), are still $110 new.

I also like the mellanox approach as I think they adhere to the open SFP+ port standards, so you might have good luck getting a DAC working from the switch to computers using generic DAC cables.

https://www.fs.com/c/generic-10g-sfp-dac-3412

Check with FS though, they can probably advise on what tranciever encoding the QNAP switch might need.


NAS:

Not sure how much you want to spend here, but I think if I were spending $1000 I would expect one with a lot more drive bays than 4....

There are some on amazon I'm seeing for under $1000 with SSD cache bays.. Lots of options around $700 that look nice enough. I'm not sure what other workloads you have in mind for this device, but something with an Intel "core" CPU for quicksync might be helpful if you're looking for a video transcoding solution to be included.


Drives....

Consider starting with 2 X 8TB drives instead of 4 X 4. Gives you upgrade headroom and the cost per TB isn't much different. Heck... 12TB drives are not bad for cost per TB either.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "DDR3/LGA1151"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

A used i7-4930K and Socket 2011 motherboard might be something to look out for?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Remote Desktop Video Editing"

  • 1 month ago
  • 4 points

The big challenge you're going to run into is getting the footage from where you're at back to your editing rig. It will have to be local on the editing rig for you to manipulate it.

If the footage is 100Mbps, and your hotel wifi throttles you to 10Mbps, then it's going to take 10 seconds per 1 second of footage to send the recorded footage back to HQ for editing.

So first you have to solve that problem.... Some remote desktop tools support file transfers, but keep in mind that while the remote desktop session is open, bandwidth is being used for the session, so this isn't the best way to deliver data.

Syncronizing the data with onedrive, or another cloud based solution is probably easiest and fastest. because both ends get a "cloud based" middle man to set things in motion requiring no specialized network configuration on your part. Configure onedrive to download all files on your desktop by disabling files on demand. I use onedrive as the example here due to familiarity, but there are many other services that work similarly that could broker this data drop. Google Drive, Dropbox, etc.

A more complex but more direct data transfer, would involve setting up a VPN or port forward for a file server configuration hosted from your home computer. VPN is preferred IMO as it provides opportunity for multiple layers of protection (have to authenticate to the VPN, potentially with both a password and key, as well as authenticate to the computer on the network.

Assuming you are willing to wait to transfer the footage, there are a number of ways to do remote desktop, starting with traditional remote desktop services that require that your desktop computer at home operate as a remote desktop "server" of sorts. This would require hosting a VPN capability for you to "tunnel" home to and initiate a remote desktop connection through using the native remote desktop function in Windows. Alternatively, a port-forward on your router for incoming remote desktop session requests (not as secure).

Alternatively, there are now many remote desktop tools on the market that use a cloud based intermediary, so that we don't require any special network configuration. Both ends appear to their local firewalls, to be initiating "outgoing" connections to the cloud man-in-the-middle. You will have to configure the machine you want to connect to, to not go to sleep, and run the "agent" software required to initiate the connection prior to setting out on your voyage, but once the software is configured it should be very easy to use.

These "easier" cloud solutions are available free from some sources, like google, and paid from others, like LogMeIn. I believe "gotomypc" is based on the same remote desktop tech that we use at work (rescue assist) for remote work.

In all examples, having a good, low latency, high bandwidth connection between the machines is required for reasonable levels of productivity on basic desktops.

I suspect whatever differences there are from one solution to the next will be academic. I don't think ANY of them will work well for editing video from afar. In my experience these solutions are just to clunky. It's fine for troubleshooting a problem, clicking on stuff that is stationary, but video editing over the large lag introduced by these connections would be very annoying. Imagine hitting the "play" button, only to have it take about a second before it starts to play, then getting a very garbled looking video stream of the playback because it can only send a limited amount of detail through the stream. The more motion, the lower the quality gets. Then hit stop, and again, a second or so for it to respond. It would be really hard to perform those fast play/stop/splice/cut/etc operations when chopping up footage into usable clips. It would also be difficult to identify what parts of the clips are worth keeping (is it in focus? is it blurry because of the remote desktop or because the lens was out of focus on the original?)... See this gets messy.....


My advise.... Keep your eye out for a good laptop... We bought one of these for someone at work recently....

Omen by HP 2019 15-Inch Gaming Laptop....

Intel i7-9750H Processor, NVIDIA GTX 1660Ti 6 GB, 8 GB RAM, 256 GB SSD, Windows 10 Home (15-dc1020nr, Black).

It was about $1K on amazon. We opened it up and installed 32GB RAM, a 1TB SSD, and upgraded to WinPro.

Worked out to ~$1450 all said and done. Powerhouse portable with a cool red keyboard and BIG power adapter (200W) and pretty good internal cooling. No doubt this machine would edit video pretty well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Probably going to want to keep researching.... you know how these things go ;)

Consider the Ubiquiti EdgeRouter 4 instead of the XR700 router functionality. This is about $200

Consider deploying a number of UniFi AC Lite Access Points throughout the space (presumably large if you need 100 ft long cables?). These are around $90 new, and about $50 used (lots of used available out there from business leftovers). A lower bandwidth mesh network with great coverage everywhere is better than a high bandwidth single hotspot that only works well for nearby devices.

Consider either building your own NAS or re-purposing an old rack mount server. You'll probably get more for your money and can put a 10Gb card in there (or it may come with one). Check out refurbished Dell Poweredge R420/520/720 series on Newegg Marketplace. You can get a very powerful old server for only a few hundred bucks. Use FreeNAS or something similar with a decently well developed virtual machine / docker capability to run a ubiquity unify controller from for your mesh network management. (there are lots of guides out there for this).

There are also lots of guides out there to running a unify controller from Synology and QNAP NAS devices as a docker app. Some googling suggests this can also be done from a Asustor NAS as well. Either way, if you're planning to spin up a "NAS" solution anyway, then you're already going to have a 24/7 operating machine on your network that can serve more purposes than just data storage. This is a great place to host mesh network management from.

Consider a Netgear XS508M switch instead of the GS808E. 8 ports of 10G to play with internally between wired machines and the NAS. Having a lot of 10G ports is expensive. This is about a $500 chunk.

Consider a Netgear GS310TP to provide POE to access points, and basic 1G ports for other devices. ~$140.

My conceptualization for running Fiber in my thoughts above, was more as a "lay it and leave it for later" approach. Stick to CAT6A for now to connect devices, but consider running the fiber options as they may be useful in the figure. Use "10GBaseT" network cards for now.

Other Thoughts:

Network gear that is all dressed up in "gaming" related marketing **** is likely over-priced for what it is.. Case in point, the S8000 vs GS110MX. Same number of the same type of ports. The "gaming" version comes with a $50 "ooh shiny" tax.

10GTek and FS are very cheap but pretty good 3rd party alternatives for the money. I've used transceivers and DAC's from them with no issues. They are "honestish" chinese ripoff operations that aren't trying to counterfeit, but rather, make their own name as a cheap alternative to the name brand.

NIC's that seem too good to be true, might be counterfeit. My hunch here is that a $35 10G card, whether it claims to be a refurb, or a pull, or whatever, is more likely a counterfeit card. Many of these do function, but be aware of the risks that come with counterfeits (possible security issues, more likely to fail young, possibly incomplete feature-sets, etc).

Aquantia NIC's don't have the performance of traditional options from mellanox/intel/broadcom/etc. Cheap for a reason. Not a really "complete" or full performing 10G implementation, but that may still be acceptable.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

post your building using the markup generating tool.... A link to a private parts list doesn't show me anything. ;)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I suppose if you're pulling cable through walls, it might make sense to give yourself some margin for "future proofing" but keep in mind that by the time anything over 10G is feasible over copper using CAT8, it's likely you'll have access to "5G" private wireless network technology or some future wifi version, which is likely to be 20+Gb anyway, so... May as well just use 6A for now.

The other issue, is that by the time 10G is actually due for upgrade, like 10-20 years from now (remember 1G to the desktop is approaching 20 years old and still going strong as a mainstream connection), it's highly unlikely that a higher specification of ethernet cable installed today will open any technological doors. By then, there is apt to be some other cable/connection/fiber/something standard that replaces what we're doing today. Fiber is more likely to buy a useful upgrade path, but then, what fiber available today will have the best options for short-run, high bandwidth in the future? The conventional wisdom of today's market may not apply in 10+ years from now so "future" proofing a network cable install is not an easy task.

With that said, if I wanted to pull a cable that would be likely to support very high bandwidth for future upgrades, a duplex of single mode OS2 or multimode OM4 fiber terminated to LC-UPC is hard to beat. The single mode variety is already in use for 100Gbps applications using QSFP28 transceivers. Price wise the cable is dirt cheap.... 100ft pre-terminated for ~$20-40 at fs.com. Pull it alongside a pull of 6A for less total cost than CAT8 and have a feasible path to 100G already paved. The down-side to this, is that again, we really don't know what changes in tech will do to this selection. LC is popular right now because it fits nicely at the tip of an SFP sized transceiver. My hunch is that this will be a mainstream, commodity-use connection for a long time that is likely to have lots of options in the future for high bandwidth, but even if not, it's only a $20-40 gamble.

If you're just buying patch cables (pre-terminated), then I would assume they aren't going in walls? In which case, just get CAT6A short patches and maybe a CAT7 for your 100 footers. Buy pre-made cables for the tech you're using them with today, replace them for future upgrades that demand something better. I wouldn't expect a "CAT8" cable to still perform at the "CAT8" spec after oxidizing and corroding and physical wear and tear of 10+ years of use anyway. A long patch cable is a consumable.

If you're buying bulk cable to pull through walls and terminate yourself, there's a good chance your termination quality won't really be a "cat8" worthy termination anyway, or even "CAT7" worthy for that matter. So.... why pay for the fancy cable? Shielded 6A will carry 10G through your house really nicely and be easier to terminate with only a single outer shield, rather than many separate shields. Unshielded 6A will be even easier to terminate and work with, and will likely still carry 10G through "house" distances no problem. I'd be inclined to bundle some fiber alongside it as a future upgrade option instead of bothering with CAT8. A bundle of OS2 duplex and OM4 duplex and CAT6A combined would probably cost less than a CAT8 cable of the same length.


In commercial environments, big bundles of fiber come into the riser rooms of commercial buildings ready to deliver 1-10-100Gb to on-site customers. In residential space, I expect the "path" to more-than-1G is likely to come from 5G wireless, not from a fiber or coax line, so there's really no point in a 10G cable modem.

There are switches and routers capable of way beyond 10G per port. A modern "core" switch for big data-center/enterprise networks can be 100G per port.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cat 8 Where to find a Legit place to buy?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 6 points

For household ranges of 10G-BaseT, CAT6A usually works fine unless you have a very large house or have a lot of RF interference, in which case CAT7 works fine.

The CAT8 spec is overkill for what you're doing. I might spring for CAT7 on your longer runs but for your shorter 3-10 foot cables you could use slimline CAT6A patch cables.

If you're worried about "bogus" cables buy from MonoPrice instead. The CAT6A slimline 30AWG cables are great for <10ft patches and are dirt cheap. I use their 28AWG CAT6 in our patch panels at work for 1G applications with low power POE. Despite being "only" CAT6 I have used these on some 10G uplink ports and they work at 10G.

For longer runs, get shielded CAT7 to be certain.

For flushing money, they offer true CAT8 cables as well, if you feel so inclined. These is specified for 25Gbps/40Gbps, so overkill for what you're doing. A "fake" CAT8 cable from amazon would still probably work fine for most 10G applications as well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3600X for 1080p video editing?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

The price premium for the 3600X is worth it for the better cooler alone, if planning to use stock cooler anyway.

If not planning to use stock cooler, then sure, 3600.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What is SMT useful for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Think of a CPU core as a kitchen full of cooks. Each cook represents a separate instruction pipeline within the core.

Think of the scheduler as a kitchen manager, converting the incoming orders into a series of instructions for each chef to perform to get all the proper dishes made as fast as possible. The kitchen manager can only assign tasks 1 at a time, often having to wait for a cook to finish a task before ordering the next task. This results in a chef task saturation rate of ~70%.

Think of SMT as having 2 kitchen managers in the kitchen instead of one. If things go well, the additional oversight can keep more of the chefs saturated with work and maximizing their cooking throughput. If things go badly, the 2 kitchen managers wind up making it worse. Whether there is an improvement or drawback depends on the workload...

Modern X86 cores are designed with very wide out-of-order instruction pipelines. They are very wide in an effort to achieve the highest possible execution throughput to a single thread, but as a consequence of this design, will have under-utilization when only working on a single thread at a time. For software that can make use of more threads than there are cores in a CPU, SMT enables the scheduling of work from 2 separate threads on back-end execution resources in a core at the same time, thus, taking advantage of otherwise idle execution resources.


Any workload that can scale to more threads than there are CPU cores available, can typically scale up performance with SMT enabled.

The threshold for this, varies depending on what sort of CPU we're starting with vs what sort of workload.

For gaming, SMT is HEAVILY utilized on dual core CPU's. Most games completely saturate at least 1-2 threads and have plenty more work on a few additional threads to be performed. On the other hand, if we have a 6 core CPU, enabling SMT makes basically no difference, since the workload already has access to all the parallelism it can take advantage of with the 6 threads of the CPU.

Some software is "stupid" and will attempt to spawn as many threads as are available in the CPU, despite there being threshold where scaling to more threads is actually detrimental to performance for various reasons (takes more compute work to split and rejoin the output than the uplift provided by more cores or SMT). In these cases, we're often better off with CPU's without SMT, or disabling it.

Some software scales incredibly well with SMT. Almost any non-real-time workload that can be broken up into unique buckets of work, with a centralized low-overhead management system, works great with SMT and lots of cores. Rendering is a great example.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Returning Liquid Cooler (Scared)"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Consider the thermalright Le Grand Macho RT. It's offset should clear the RAM, and it's "stepped" back side should clear the heatsink/IO stuff on the board:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $484.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Thermalright Le Grand Macho RT 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $79.98 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte Z390 AORUS MASTER ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $289.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (4 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $204.99 @ Newegg
Storage Corsair MP510 1.92 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $274.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Asus GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card $1263.99 @ Best Buy
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $129.97 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2798.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-24 10:21 EDT-0400

Consider the MP510 for the SSD to cut costs. Won't make any tangible difference in performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Server pc"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

https://www.newegg.com/p/1VK-0001-2C0R6?Item=9SIAC0F8BV0517

Chassis/PSU/MOBO: Dell Precision T3610

CPU: E5-2643 v2 3.5GHz 6-Cores

RAM: 32GB DDR3

GPU: Quadro K600

SSD: NEW 512GB SSD

OS: Windows 10 Pro

Price: ~$500

Comparable to a Ryzen 1600 build in terms of performance, but costs less and comes with more RAM.


If I really wanted to build it:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $144.99 @ Best Buy
Motherboard ASRock B365M-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard $84.99 @ Amazon
Memory Patriot Viper Elite 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $109.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $63.98 @ OutletPC
Case Cooler Master Elite 110 Mini ITX Tower Case $50.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $53.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $117.95 @ Amazon
GPU K600 $41.00 @ Newegg Marketplace Vendor (refurb)
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $667.86
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-20 19:31 EDT-0400

Maybe something like that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Downgrade CPU for monitor?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 8 points

Where's your priority? Performance or visual quality?

9700K with a 1080P monitor is good for high-FPS priority across a wide range of games (basically, as good as it gets performance).

Less CPU with 1440P monitor is good for a more balanced approach to performance vs visual quality.

A 9600K, will actually run most games about on par with the 9700K, since they are both high-clocked "lake" architecture CPU's, however, I would say that the 9600K, is more likely to run into issues with stutter and lower FPS minimums in some modern games that scale to many threads due to having fewer cores and no SMT/HT.

If I were going to "step down" the CPU, and step up to 1440P, I think the Ryzen 3600 with a basic heatpipe cooler or 3600X on stock cooling is a more logical approach than the 9600K with an AIO. Sure the 3600 will fall short of the maximum FPS possible on a 9600K by a few percent, but at 1440P, that few percent advantage for the 9600K for max FPS is buried under a GPU bottleneck in most games anyway (unless you have a flagship GPU and/or turn settings way down), or in the case of esports titles, either CPU can achieve FPS way higher than the monitor refresh anyway (like 200+FPS), so again the advantage of the 9600K is buried under a different bottleneck. On the other hand, the advantage of the 3600 is a lot more raw compute throughput made available by a much wider instruction pipeline and the ability to schedule 2 threads per core (SMT enabled). That advantage steps in on the FPS minimums and stutter. The game is less likely to stutter when a background task runs, because the game threads and background tasks have more compute resources to share. The 3600 on a basic heatpipe, or a 3600X on stock cooler, are both a fair bit less expensive than a 9600K on an AIO as well. The savings could be put towards more GPU, which is going to be more useful at 1440P, especially if the driving motivation behind a 1440P is to move up the visual quality ladder. (presumably, you'd want to be able to run 1440P at settings that don't make it look worse than 1080P would have at higher settings).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Sorry Randomizer,

Sell it for as much as you can.

I think it's worth $250 tops (though it would depend on the specific motherboard. Some folks think it's worth more, no harm in trying to sell for more.

I think you're more likely to get a great price for your 6700K sold individually rather than with the Z170. That's where the demand+ignorance is likely combining to push prices up on these.

Lots of people out there regretting their i5-6500's now in a world of 6-8 core's being standard desktop fair. The 6700K/7700K are the best upgrade options to carry those builds through another year or 2. They already have a motherboard, so your motherboard has no value to those many buyers.

Anyone in the market for BOTH a CPU and MOBO, Is better served to buy a new CPU and MOBO anyway. Buying motherboards used is always a crap-shoot and people know it.

The "debate" going on here in the noise is how to evaluate the value of used computer parts and what CPU would be a good reference to use as a basis for valuation of the 6700K/Z170.

I like the approach of figuring out what "new" CPU would be roughly similar to get a starting point for the value of a CPU. "IforgotMy" thinks a reasonable CPU/mobo to make this comparison with is a 3600. Considering the 3600 offers up to 75% higher execution throughput and double the I/O, I would not use this as a CPU of choice to get a baseline "what if this were new" value for a 6700K. It's in a different league.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

I would tend to agree.

Threads like this are an opportunity to expose some of the "broken market" issue. With any luck maybe we can get the used computer market (primarily intel used) to start correcting.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

In my comparison example, I wanted to match or exceed the performance of the 6700K as closely as possible in all regards.

The 9400, at within 2% according to your link, is a far closer match than a 3600.

Anyway, OCing a CPU doesn't really reduce its value unless...

Unless the market says so. If I'm in the market for a used CPU, I would factor in heavier depreciation for any CPU and Motherboard that were overclocked or likely to have been overclocked.

You can choose to consider this a devaluing effect or not, but personally, I think you'd be crazy not to.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

There's no good reason for anyone to be paying those price and no good reason for anyone to be asking those prices.

A broken market full of ignorance on both sides of the equation should not be encouraged.

Don't forget, there's also the 9400F for like $140 that offers 6700K performance for even less money to any buyer who doesn't need the iGPU. Even more reason the 6700K shouldn't be worth what people are paying for it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is 120GB too small?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Yes

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

I'm not forgetting about overclocking potential.

The fact that the Z170 and 6700K could be overclocked, reduces their value even further because they may have been.

The 6700K is a poor overclocker. 10-15% isn't trouncing anything.

50% more cores beats hyperthreading by 25% at equal clocks, 6700K can't be overclocked enough to close the gap.

A 6C/6T arrangement is better than 4C/8T, as more execution throughput can be achieved across fewer threads, so the performance scales better for games and other real-time worklaods on the 9400. Less software optimization required for performance uplift across threads.

Using the 9400/B365 as a basis for comparison is more than generous.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How much to sell a 6700k and z170 board for"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

An i5-9400 is closer to the performance offered by a 6700K than a 3600.

A B365 offers similar IO/feature-set to a Z170. I don't think it's reasonable to use X570 as the basis for "valuing" a Z170 board without an additional depreciation factor for the generational differences in I/O.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9400 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $239.75 @ shopRBC
Motherboard ASRock B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $142.06 @ Vuugo
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $381.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-18 23:39 EDT-0400

30-40% depreciation for being used....

~$250.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is 2.5 gigabit neccessary?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Unless you plan to buy a $1000+/mo commercial fiber internet plan that delivers 2+G of upstream/downstream to your location, then having 2.5G local networking will have no impact.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "LAN party gaming build ~$900US : will review!"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor $234.29 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock X570 PHANTOM GAMING 4 WIFI ax ATX AM4 Motherboard $149.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX900 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $33.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB VENTUS OC Video Card $409.89 @ OutletPC
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Alienware AW768 Wired Gaming Keyboard Purchased For $0.00
Mouse Razer DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse Purchased For $0.00
Headphones Corsair VOID PRO RGB (White/Black) 7.1 Channel Headset Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1293.11
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-13 22:34 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "So what's "the deal" for these x99 Xeon chips?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Yea a 2690v3 running at a fixed 3.5GHZ would be a pretty respectable computer! Gaming performance won't be top tier or anything, but there will never be a situation where the number of cores prevents any single compute intensive thread from having unimpeded access to a core, so there's something to be said for the consistency this delivers in gaming. (Usually can count on a stutter-free experience with more consistent FPS minimums).

What motherboard do you have?

https://hardforum.com/threads/unlocking-max-turbo-bins-of-xeons-on-x99-1.1927809/

There's a thread discussing doing the "hack" to lock all cores at max turbo. Sounds like ASRock boards are the most popular for this.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "LAN party gaming build ~$900US : will review!"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

My hunch is that the effort required to consolidate this into a single node, is likely more than 8-12 hours in total for someone of reasonable competence and a general familiarity with the concept but no prior experience. Probably closer to 24 hours worth of research/leaning and another 24 hours worth of trial/error is more realistic.

With that said, there is some time saved only having to build 1 computer on the physical side. Only 1 CPU to install. Only 1 PSU to route cables for. Only 1 case to deal with. This could save 2-4 hours depending on how fast of a builder you are.

I think it might be worth holding out for Threadripper 3000 for this build if you wanted to tackle this as a single-node, multi-head deployment....


Here's an idea to put in the bin for the standard "build 2 computers" approach....

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $139.99 @ Best Buy
Motherboard ASRock B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Amazon
Memory Patriot Viper Elite 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $63.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB VENTUS OC Video Card $409.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fractal Design Focus G Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case $54.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Alienware AW768 Wired Gaming Keyboard Purchased For $0.00
Mouse Razer DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse Purchased For $0.00
Headphones Corsair VOID PRO RGB (White/Black) 7.1 Channel Headset Purchased For $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1068.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-13 19:43 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "So what's "the deal" for these x99 Xeon chips?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 4 points

Problem is i can't make heads or tails of the xeon product model schemes, and it's got me frustrated enough to want to shoot the idiots responsible for it. Like, v3, v4, e5? L? W? What the heck does any of it mean?

The "deal" is that the part numbers for Xeons are confusing, and that's just how it is. Some of the letters/numbers have consistent meaning through the range, some are a bit random, and there are many custom OEM parts out there in the wild that you won't find an Intel specification sheet for, so that further complicates things.

E5 Xeon's represent the family of quad-channel memory Xeon CPU's found on variations of socket 2011 and embedded LGA1356, from sandy bridge through broadwell, in 1-4S socket scalabillity configurations.

Socket 2011 is Bridge.

Socket 2011-V3 is Well.

V1 (listed with no version number) is Sandy Bridge.

V2 is Ivy Bridge.

V3 is Haswell.

V4 is Broadwell.

1600 series are single socket 2011/2011-v3

2600 series are dual socket 2011/2011-v3 scalable.

4600 series are quad socket 2011/2011-v3 scalable.

1400 series are single socket LGA1356 embedded.

2400 series are dual socket scalable on LGA1356 embedded.


Here's some rules of thumb to follow:

16XX/2637/2643/2667/2687W models are frequency optimized. The "W" stands for "workstation" and should represent the highest performing frequency optimized part available in the family. (often has a higher-than-normal TDP for the family).

Part numbers ending in 95/96/97/98/99 are usually core-count optimized. (high density compute optimized).

Part numbers ending 08/18/28/38/48/58 are low TDP models. Lower clock speeds. Part numbers that add an "L" are even lower TDP models with even lower clock speeds. Many of these have Turbo Boost disabled.

Part numbers ending in 03/09 are feature stripped, low core count, non-hyper-threaded, fixed low-frequency CPU's designed to fill an I/O role for low-compute applications.

Most of the standard "retail" part numbers with no special optimizations have part numbers ending in "0" ... 2620, 2630, 2640, 2650, 2660, 2670, 2680 etc. Higher model numbers correspond to more compute power derived from increasing core counts and frequency.

There are some "odd ducks" out there that are all alone. The 2623 V3/V4 don't really set a trend for what "23" is supposed to mean. Night shift CPU's...


1600 series can be overclocked on some motherboards. The 8 core 1660/1680 V3/V4 options are going to be your highest core count option that supports overclocking in the Xeon range. If you want more overclocking cores than this, then you're looking for an i7-6950X (10 core).

2600/4600 series do not support overclocking, however some motherboards can attempt to fix the CPU at it's maximum turbo speed, so this could mean 3.5GHZ+ for some of the higher core count SKU's.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "LAN party gaming build ~$900US : will review!"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I'm not very familiar with doing this type of setup, but I was considering building a similar PC with projectors and pop out peripherals for a dual-user portable LAN setup.

Before proceeding down this path, it's worth asking if you're comfortable getting into the "learning zone" for the virtual machine deployment and hardware pass-through. Also, it might be important to have some "footing" in terms of what this means. Are you familiar with the premise of virtualization? The role of a hypervisor? You'll need to sort of get your head wrapped around the logical arrangement taking place inside the machine. If you're new to this as a concept, factor in a couple days of learning/researching/experimenting to wrap your head around it. It's not that hard but like any new information it often takes a few days of "sinking in" for the big picture to come together. You might be well served to do some experimentation on your personal computer using VirtualBox, to help conceptualize what is happening.

Compared to building a pair of separate computers and getting them running games, I expect for a first-time setup of this dual VM machine, you should expect a few extra solid days of tinkering and experimenting and researching to get it all working (on top of some initial learning about virtualization). There are a lot of virtualization settings that may have to be tweaked, which, can be fun for some of us (I would enjoy this sort of a project because it is academically interesting), but might be bothersome to someone who just wants to game.

The good news, is that a bunch of people have paved this path (lots of videos on youtube, articles, etc), and unraid has really simplified the effort with an interface for almost all settings you'll need to tinker with to make this work. It shouldn't require passing a bunch of command line, but an occasional config file edit and some BIOS settings experimentation isn't out of the question.

A complication that just occurred to me, is the chicken/egg problem that will arise after assigning the GPU's to VMs.. With no integrated graphics provided by a baseboard management or on-chip GPU, the unraid configuration will ONLY be accessible by web interface once the machines are set up... Might be worth going back to the X399 platform to have an additional slot to install a refurb K600 into ($40), or use an Intel 9900 for integrated graphics, or use a server system with baseboard management.


I already have headsets, keyboards, and mice that I found for REALLY good deals.

Are the headsets USB or line-audio? Stereo? 5.1?


Rabbit hole proceed mode?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best bang for buck"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

The problem with upgrading to a 4790K, is that the used market for CPU's is broken.

The CPU shouldn't be worth more than about $100 used, when we consider how it stacks up to new CPU's (A Ryzen 2600 for $120 and i5-9400F for $140) and depreciate it for being used (shouldn't that drop at least 30% of the value?) ... yet, the market is demanding and getting $200 a pop for them. I have no ready explanation for what is driving that insanity. Used 4790K for the price of a NEW Ryzen 5 3600.....??? (The 3600 offers about 10-15% better single thread and 50-80% better multi-threaded performance).

$200 to "upgrade" to a 4790K will mean that even if you sell the 4590 for $60 (going rate), you will have spent $340 on CPU's for this build, the cost of a 4790K back when you built this rig, yet missed out on 4790K performance for most of the machines life... yuck.

That would be a really tough pill to swallow for me. Maybe compromise on a 4790 (non-k) for ~$130?

I would put the $200 towards a 3600 instead.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "LAN party gaming build ~$900US : will review!"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

My plan is to make two PCs that can run any multiplayer game at ok/good settings minimum

I was under the impression you were asking for a pair of $900 gaming PC's. That's $1800 total for the 2 by my calculations, bringing this build $300 under budget....

Upon review of your original post, there is no definitive language stating whether the $900 is intended to be per PC or a total budget for both.

If the goal is to build a pair of gaming PC's for $1500 total (peripherals included), then consider the following:


PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor (Assign 6-7 virtual cores per VM) $194.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock X470 Master SLI/AC ATX AM4 Motherboard $134.99 @ Newegg
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory (Assign ~12-14GB per VM) $119.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX900 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (Hypervisor Boot Drive) $33.99 @ Amazon
Storage ADATA SU635 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (pass-through to VM1) $44.99 @ Amazon
Storage ADATA SU635 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (pass-through to VM2) $44.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card (pass-through to VM1, pass-through DP audio as well to monitor) $184.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card (pass-through to VM2, pass-through DP audio as well to monitor) $184.99 @ Newegg
Case Cougar MX330-G ATX Mid Tower Case $43.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $119.98 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $144.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard With Optical Mouse $27.98 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard With Optical Mouse $27.98 @ Amazon
Custom Feb Smart 2 Ports USB 3.0(Super Fast 5Gbps)PCI Express (PCIe) Expansion Card (pass-through to VM1) $25.99 @ Amazon
Custom Feb Smart 2 Ports USB 3.0(Super Fast 5Gbps)PCI Express (PCIe) Expansion Card (pass-through to VM2) $25.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1504.72
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-13 15:54 EDT-0400

There's $1500 for a dual head gaming PC with mouse/key/monitor for each user. It would be nice to spend a bit more to beef it up to a 3700X or 3900X... do you own a Ryzen CPU you could use for BIOS update if needed?

The $1500 doesn't include the pair of Win10 licences you'll need (you can get these for $116 each at Trusted Tech Team), or the $60 UNRAID basic license. This price also does not completely address audio for each user. The audio output can be either the 1/8" headphone jack on each monitor, derived from the DP audio assignment (output only), or a USB audio device connected to the USB controller assigned to each VM. If you need microphones/headsets I highly recommend USB type for this so that you don't need an additional sound card.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "LAN party gaming build ~$900US : will review!"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I would be very tempted to do a dual-head gaming box with unraid just for fun... ;)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Threadripper 1920X 3.5 GHz 12-Core Processor (Assign 10 "logical" CPU's per VM, 5-core) $199.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3 54.97 CFM CPU Cooler $69.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock X399 Taichi ATX TR4 Motherboard $319.99 @ Amazon
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 32 GB (4 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory (Allocate ~12GB per VM) $129.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX900 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $33.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX900 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (pass-through to VM1) $56.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX900 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (pass-through to VM2) $56.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card (pass-through to VM1) $184.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card (pass-through to VM2) $184.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case $89.98 @ NZXT
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $119.98 @ Amazon
Custom [Feb Smart 2 Ports USB 3.0(Super Fast 5Gbps)PCI Express (PCIe) Expansion Card (pass-through to VM1) $25.99 @ Amazon
Custom [Feb Smart 2 Ports USB 3.0(Super Fast 5Gbps)PCI Express (PCIe) Expansion Card (pass-through to VM2) $25.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1499.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-13 09:02 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to upgrade this rig from 2016. Are there any changes I can make that will make a vast improvement?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Depends on what monitor you're using and what your performance and visual quality goals are on that monitor.

For 60hz, your CPU is fine. An upgrade will have very little impact in most games and conditions. For 100hz+ performance goals, your CPU will be a bottleneck in some modern games, a meaningful performance uplift (~20-50%) could be realized in some of these games by moving to a newer CPU with more cores, and higher clock speeds (coffeelake/refresh) or higher IPC (Zen2). Either would require a motherboard upgrade. An i7-7700/7700K would be a possible stop-gap upgrade that would provide some of this uplift. (good clock speed uplift and hyperthreading).

If you're happy with the visual quality you're getting from the GTX 1070 at your performance goals, then it's fine. No reason to upgrade. The GTX 1070 has no meaningful API or video functionality limitations for current gaming, and has plenty of render throughput for all modern games to be played at reasonable settings/resolution. A GPU "upgrade" may or may not have any "meaning" to you depending on how much value you place on being somewhere else on the treadmill of visual quality. In order to go from say, 1080P to 1440P, all other things being equal, you'd have to double your render throughput. From a GTX 1070, that would require a move to about a $700ish GPU (RTX 2080 / super territory), so that's a pretty serious commitment for something that is largely superficial (visual quality).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Almost Ready to Purchase Final Review"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor $200.00 @ MicroCenter
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $170.00 @ MicroCenter
Memory G.Skill Trident Z 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $139.99 @ Amazon
Storage Corsair MP510 960 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $124.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card $413.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks Eclipse P400A ATX Mid Tower Case $72.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair RM (2019) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $109.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Full 32/64-bit $116.00 @ Trusted Tech Team
Case Fan Phanteks PH-F140MP_BBK_PWM 68.09 CFM 140 mm Fan $17.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan Phanteks PH-F140MP_BBK_PWM 68.09 CFM 140 mm Fan $17.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1383.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-10-13 06:19 EDT-0400

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